Thursday, 13 September 2012

Idioms, Phrases and Expressions

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Idiom of the day

'To have a bee in your bonnet'

Meaning: To be so preoccupied with something that you are unable to stop talking about it. 

Examples: 

He's really got a bee in his bonnet about recycling - he won't stop going on about it!

My neighbour has a bee in his bonnet about people keeping their dogs under control.



Idiom of the day

'To drive someone round the bend' or 'to drive someone up the wall'

Meaning: To really annoy, anger or bore someone, to drive someone crazy.

Examples:

His constant whingeing is driving me round the bend!

It drives me up the wall when she cancels at the last minute! 




Idiom of the day

'The icing on the cake'

Meaning: Something which makes a good situation even better.

Examples:

I was pleased when I heard I had passed all of my exams but the A* in English was the icing on the cake!

We were already having a fantastic holiday in the Maldives but when my boyfriend proposed, that was the icing on the cake!




Idiom of the day

'To push the boat out'

Meaning: 

To spend a lot of money or more than usual, particularly for a special occasion.

Examples: 

Since it's your birthday, let's push the boat out and order a bottle of champagne.

They really pushed the boat out for their Golden Wedding Anniversary.



Idiom of the day

'Forty winks'

Meaning:

a nap, a short sleep

Examples:

What an exhausting day! I might just get forty winks before we go out tonight.

If I've had a late night I'll often catch forty winks on the bus to work.


Idiom of the day

'To be barking up the wrong tree'

Meaning:

To make a false assumption about something, look for something in the wrong place or go about something in the wrong way.

Origin:

The phrase alludes to a dog in pursuit of an animal, where the animal is in one tree and the dog is barking at another tree.

Example:


The police think the drugs are being imported from abroad but they're barking up the wrong tree. They should be looking much closer to home.




Source: www.englishclub.com and idioms.thefreedictionary.com


Idiom of the day

'The world is your oyster'

Does this mean the world is a slimy shellfish? No it doesn't, so why the comparison?

Meaning: 

If the world is your oyster, you have the ability and the freedom to do anything or go anywhere

Origin:

This proverb is said to have first appeared in Shakespeare's 17th Century play, 'The Merry Wives of Windsor'

Falstaff: I will not lend thee a penny. 
Pistol: Why, then, the world's mine oyster, Which I with sword will open. 
Act II, Scene II

Example:

Rob: I don't know what to do now that I've finished university. What do you think?

Andy: You could do anything - you're young, smart and have no commitments. The world is your oyster!

Source: idioms.thefreedictionary.com


Idiom of the day 

'In a nutshell'

This is a very useful phrase for summarising news or information, whether in presentations or in everyday conversation.

Meaning: 

In a few words; concisely stated.

Origin:

The origin of the phrase 'in a nutshell' is fairly straightforward. Anything that could be written in so few words that it would fit into a nutshell would have to be brief and to the point.

Example:

Interviewer: So what does your current job role actually entail?

Interviewee: I have various responsibilities but in a nutshell, I am in charge of accounts.

Source: www.phrases.org.uk


Idiom of the day 

'Keep your hair on!'






Featured in our recent blog post, 'Ageing at 24 - a Grey Area?', you may have wondered what the phrase 'keep your hair on' really means.

'Keep your hair on' is a slightly impolite way of telling someone who is angry to keep calm and not to over-react.


Example: 

Sam: Will you hurry up Jo, we're going to be late!

Jo: Alright, keep your hair on! I'll be with you in just a second.








Idiom of the day

'Wet behind the ears'




















(informal) inexperienced; naive; immature

Example:
Interview with chef Jamie Oliver taken from BBC website:


Young British people were not good at "long hours in hot kitchens", he said.
Oliver said that when he was in his 20s, it was normal for him to work 80 to 100 hours a week in the restaurant trade.
He added: "But the EU regulation now is 48 hours, which is half a week's work for me. And they still whinge about it!
"British kids particularly, I have never seen anything so wet behind the ears!
"I have mummies phoning up for 23-year-olds saying to me, 'My son is too tired.' On a 48-hour week! Are you having a laugh?"

Idiom of the day

'Throw your hat in to the ring'

to do something that makes it clear you want to compete with other people, especially to compete for a political position




Example: She's seriously considering throwing her hat in the ring and declaring herself a candidate for the election.

Source: http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com


Idiom of the day

'Barking up the wrong tree'

Fig. to make the wrong choice; to ask the wrong person; to follow the wrong course. (Alludes to a dog in pursuit of an animal, where the animal is in one tree and the dog is barking at another tree.)




Example: If you think I'm the guilty person, you're barking up the wrong tree. The hitters blamed the team's bad record on the pitchers, but they were barking up the wrong tree.

Source: http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com

11/7/13

Idiom of the day

'Give an inch take a mile'

something that you say which means that if you allow someone to behave badly at all, they will start to behave very badly.




Example: I'm always wary about making concessions to these people. Give them an inch and they'll take a mile.

Source: http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com


1/7/13

Idiom of the day

'Bite the dust'

Meaning: To crash, fail, or otherwise no longer be in contention. Can also mean to die.


















Example: John just got eliminated... Another one bites the dust! There are only four people left in this tournament.

Source: http://www.idiomreference.com

27/6/13

Idiom of the day

'Take a hint'

Meaning: to understand a hint and behave accordingly.

Example: I said I didn't want to see you anymore. Can't you take a hint? I don't like you. Sure I can take a hint, but I'd rather be told directly.

Source: http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com

19/6/13

The phrase "it's just not cricket" is used in English to say that something is unfair or dishonest.

















Examples:

I can't believe you got a ticket for the party and I didn't. It's just not cricket. 

You can't copy your essay from the internet! It's just not cricket. 

Diana admitted that she cheated in her A Level exams to get a place in a top university. It's just not cricket.

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/

18/6/13

Idiom of the day

'To make a mountain out of a molehill'




Meaning: to make a major issue out of a minor one; to exaggerate the importance of something

Source: http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com

12/6/13

Idiom of the day

'To have a screw loose'



















Meaning: to be crazy

Example:I think that woman has a screw loose - she goes out in her slippers.

Source: idioms.thefreedictionary.com

7/6/13

Idiom of the day

'Hit the ground running'

Meaning: To immediately work very hard and successfully at a new activity




















Example: If elected, they promise to hit the ground running in their first few weeks of office.

Source: idioms.thefreedictionary.com

6/6/13

Idiom of the day

'On a wing and a prayer'

Meaning: If you do something on a wing and a prayer, you do it hoping that you will succeed although you are not prepared enough for it

Example: With scarcely any funding and a staff of six, they operate on a wing and a prayer.

Source: idioms.thefreedictionary.com

29/5/13

Idiom of the day

'To drink like a fish'
















Meaning: to drink alcohol excessively; to be in the habit of drinking alcohol excessively.

Source: http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com


22/5/13

Idiom of the day

'Step up to the plate'

Meaning: To take responsibility for doing something


21/5/13

Idiom of the day

'To be up in arms'

Meaning: To be very angry














Example: Sam was up in arms about the way she was treated today

9/5/13

Idiom of the day

'Spill the beans'

Meaning: To give away a secret or a surprise

Example: 
- How did Jo find out about the surprise birthday party Dorota was planning for her?
- Samantha accidentally spilled the beans earlier today!




30/4/13

Idiom of the day

'All in the same boat'

Meaning: When everyone is facing the same challenges



22/04/13

Idiom of the day

'Pull the other one'

Meaning: Something that you say to someone when you do not believe them














04/04/13

Idiom of the day

'Over the moon'

Meaning: Very happy.

It is a very old expression that dates right back to the seventeenth century. The Oxford English Dictionary’s first example of it is from 1718 and an extract from a play in which a character exclaims: ‘I shall jump over the Moon for Joy!’.

http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2013/01/yobs-over-the-moon-about-burying-the-hatchet/

01/04/13

Easter related idiom of the day

Don't put all your eggs in one basket!













Meaning: Fig. to make everything dependent on only one thing; to place all one's resources in one place, account, etc. (If the basket is dropped, all is lost.) 

Don't invest all your money in one company. Never put all your eggs in one basket. I advise you to diversify and not to put all your eggs in one basket.

Source: http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com


01/04/13

Idiom of the day

'Rome Was Not Built In One Day'



Meaning: If you want something to be completely properly, then its going to take time.
Example: You can't expect her to finish this project in the time allotted; Rome wasn't built in a day 

Source: www.idiomsite.com

28/03/13

Idiom of the day

'A Taste Of Your Own Medicine'

Meaning: When you are mistreated the same way you mistreat others.
Source: http://www.idiomsite.com/

27/03/13

Idiom of the day

'Never Bite The Hand That Feeds You'



Meaning: Don't hurt anyone that helps you.
Example: “I know you’re upset with your parents, but don’t bite the hand that feeds you. They’ve done a lot for you over the years.”

Source: http://www.idiomsite.com/

26/03/13

Idiom of the day

'Break a leg'

Meaning: A superstitious way to say 'good luck' without saying 'good luck', but rather the opposite.

Example: I hope you break a leg today at your dance rehearsal!

Source: http://www.idiomsite.com/

25/03/13

Idiom of the day

'A leopard can't change his spots'



Meaning: You cannot change who you are

Example: 
Wife: Would you like a cup of coffee?
Husband: I only like tea.
Wife: But I like coffee. Couldn’t you just try to like coffee?
Husband: I prefer tea. A leopard can’t change its spots.
Wife: I want a divorce.

Source: www.idiommeanings.com

22/03/13

Idiom of the day

'chill somebody to the bone'



Meaning: to make someone feel very frightened 

Example: The sound of scraping at the window chilled me to the bone.

Source: http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com

21/03/13

Idiom of the day

'don't put all your eggs in one basket' 



Meaning: Don't dedicate all your resources into one thing.

Example: Jeff decided to travel to Paris to live with a girl he met on the internet. He had to sell all of his things in order to get an airplane ticket. Jeff's friends warned him that he was putting all of his eggs in one basket, but he didn’t listen. 

Source: http://www.idiomeanings.com

20/03/13

Idiom of the day

'Calm before the storm' 

A calm time immediately before period of violent activity or argument is the calm before the storm.

Example, "Oh could this be the calm before the storm"

Source: www.usingenglish.com


19/03/13

Idiom of the day

'Too many cooks spoil the broth'

This means that where there are too many people trying to do something, they make a mess of it.

Example: The structure failed because it was designed by a group of architects. Too many cooks spoil the broth.

Source: http://www.usingenglish.com




13/03/13

Idiom of the day

'To make a song and dance about something'


*other's/ *diet's
Meaning:
to make something seem more important than it really is so that everyone notices it

Example:
 I only asked her to move her car but she made such a song and dance about it. He made a real song and dance about giving up meat.


Source: http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com


7/03/13

The early bird catches the worm















Meaning:
something that you say in order to tell someone that if they want to be successful they should do something immediately

Example:
If you see a job that interests you, apply as soon as possible. The early bird catches the worm.


Source: http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com

4/03/13

Idiom of the day

'Have one's finger in too many pies'















Meaning:
Fig. to be involved in too many things; to have too many tasks going to be able to do any of them well. (See also have a finger in the pie.)

Example:
I'm too busy. I have my finger in too many pies. She never gets anything done because she has her finger in too many pies.

Source: idioms.thefreedictionary.com


1/03/13

Idiom of the day

'Let the cat out of the bag'













Meaning:
to reveal a secret or a surprise by accident



Source: idioms.thefreedictionary.com


28/02/13

Idiom of the day

'To let your hair down'



















Meaning:
to relax and enjoy yourself without worrying what other people will think


20/02/13

10 Common Expressions in English






19/02/13

Idiom of the day

'Walk in the park'
















Meaning:
If you think that a task or an activity is a 'walk in the park', it means that you find it easy and/or not challenging.

Example:

A: How was your test? Was it difficult?
B: No. It was a walk in the park because I studied really hard for it.




18/02/13

Idiom of the day

'Against the clock'















Meaning:
If you are against the clock, it means that you are short on time and rushed.



15/2/13

Idiom of the day

'Look after your pennies and the pounds will look after themselves'

Meaning:
If you look after the pennies, the pounds will look after themselves, meaning that if someone takes care not to waste small amounts of money, they will accumulate capital.



Source: www.usingenglish.com


12/2/13

Idiom of the day

'Piece of cake'

Meaning:
Fig. something easy to do. No problem. When you know what you're doing, it's a piece of cake. Glad to help. It was a piece of cake. Rescuing frightened cats is my specialty. Piece of cake!













Source: http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com



5/2/13

Idiom of the day

'Slap on the wrist'

Meaning:
to get a light punishment (for doing something wrong).



















Source: http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com


30/1/13

Idiom of the day:

'To go out on a limb'

Meaning:
If you go out on a limb, you state an opinion or you do something which is very different to most other people.

Example:
I don't think we're going out on a limb in claiming that global warming is a problem that must be addressed. Rob Thompson, the producer, admits the series is going out on a limb in that it is quite different to anything else currently on television.


Source: http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com


28/1/13

Expression of the day:

'Tight-lipped'




































Source: www.falibo.com

24/1/13

Idiom of the day:

'a taste of one's own medicine'

Meaning:

Fig. a sample of the unpleasantness that one has been giving other people

Example:

Now you see how it feels to have someone call you names! You are getting a taste of your own medicine! John, who is often rude and abrupt with people, was devastated when the teacher treated him rudely. He doesn't like having a dose of his own medicine.

23/1/13

Idiom of the day:

'To take something with a pinch of salt'


Meaning: 

to not completely believe something that you are told, because you think it is unlikely to be true

Example: 

You have to take everything she says with a pinch of salt, she does tend to exaggerate.

Source: dictionary.cambridge.org


21/1/13

Idiom of the day:

'To cost an arm and a leg'




Meaning: To be very expensive

Example -
Sam: I just bought some new socks  - they cost me an arm and a leg!
Jo: Why, how much did they cost?
Sam: Fifty pounds
Jo: Wowzer!


Source: http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com


18/1/13

Idiom of the day:

'Love me, love my dog'

Meaning: If you love someone, you should accept everything and everyone that the person loves















Source: http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com



17/1/13

Idiom of the day:

'To give the cold shoulder'

Meaning: to behave towards someone in a way that is not at all friendly, sometimes for reasons that this person does not understand 

Example:

Jo: "What have I done to annoy Will?"

Sam: "I'm not sure, but he has definitely been giving you the cold shoulder, all day!"





14/1/13

Idiom of the day:

To get your knickers in a twist

Meaning: To become very upset about something, usually something that is not important

Example:
Now, before you get your knickers in a twist, let me explain the situation.




Source: http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com


10/1/13

Idiom of the day:

My giddy aunt!

Meaning: An exclamation of surprise

Example:
Dorota: Sam is drinking gin rather than tea at breakfast time.
Jo: My giddy aunt!




9/1/13

Idiom of the day:

The straw that broke the camel's back

Meaning: the last in a series of unpleasant events which finally makes you feel that you cannot continue to accept a bad situation

Example:
Losing my job was bad enough but having the relationship end like that was the straw that broke the camel's back.



Source: http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com 


2/1/13

Idiom of the day:

To bet your bottom dollar

Meaning: To be absolutely sure about something






The cowboy is going to literally bet his bottom (last) dollar.


Source: http://www.idioms4you.com


31/12/12

Idiom of the day:

To ring in the new year

Fig. to celebrate the beginning of the new year at midnight on December 31.

Example
We are planning a big party to ring in the new year. How did you ring in the new year?

Source: idiom.thefreedictionary.com

28/12/12

Idiom of the day:

Kill two birds with one stone

Meaning: 
When you kill two birds with one stone, you resolve two difficulties or matters with a single action

Source: www.usingenglish.com

27/12/12

Idiom of the day:

A Picture Paints a Thousand Words: 

Meaning:
A visual presentation is far more descriptive than words.

Source: www.idiomsite.com

19/12/12

Phrase of the day:
Once in a blue moon

Meaning: 
Very rarely

Origin:
Very occasionally, the moon actually does appear to be blue. This sometimes occurs after a volcanic eruption, like that of Krakatao in 1883. Dust particles in the atmosphere are normally of a size to diffract blue light, making the moon appear reddish at sunset. Larger volcanic dust particles diffract red light, making the moon appear bluish.


Tempting as it is to suppose that something that happens very rarely, and which is mentioned by name in a phrase that means 'very rarely', is the source of the phrase, it probably isn't.

Actual examples of the moon appearing blue would in fact be the exception that proves the rule, as the 'blue moon' was originally something that was considered not rare but impossible. The two notions, 'a blue moon' and 'the moon is made of green cheese', were synonyms for absurdity, like 'pigs might fly'.

The 'blue moon' expression with the 'impossibility' meaning is old and dates back to mediaeval England; for example, a work by William Barlow, the Bishop of Chichester, the Treatyse of the Buryall of the Masse, 1528, included a sarcastic reference to a blue moon:

Yf they saye the mone is belewe, 
We must beleve that it is true.

Source: www.phrases.org.uk


17/12/12

Idiom of the day
- 'To talk shop'

Meaning:
If you talk shop, you talk about work matters, especially if you do this outside work.
















Source: www.usingenglish.com


14/12/12

Turkey idioms

Since this bizarre-looking bird will soon be on the dinner table as part of the Christmas celebrations, it seemed only right to pick out some turkey-themed idioms for today's language lab post. Impress your friends by pulling these phrases out of the bag at your Christmas celebrations.

to be a real turkey
If something is a 'real turkey', it is a failure.
Example: His latest movie is a real turkey.

to go cold turkey
If an addict goes 'cold turkey', they suddenly give up and often experience unpleasant side effects as a result.
Example: I quit smoking cold turkey.

to talk turkey
to talk about something seriously
Example: John wanted to talk turkey, but Jane just wanted to joke around.


Source: www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com

11/12/12

Phrase of the Day: 'Snowed under'

If you are 'snowed under', you have too much to do and not enough time to do it.
For example:
I'm sorry, I can't write that report for you right now – I'm snowed under with work today.
I'm going to treat myself to a spa weekend. I've been so snowed under this week; I need some time to relax.

Don't confuse it with:
When the snow falls so heavily that you can't leave the house, we say that you are 'snowed in'.
Wendy rang to say that she can't come for dinner tonight – she's snowed in! 

Radcliffe Camera, Oxford

Source: www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish



6/12/12

Explosive Idiom of the day! 'Blast from the past'

Meaning:

Something or someone that returns after a period of obscurity or absence. It is normally applied to things that that were thought fondly of previously and are making a welcome return - particularly pop songs.



Origin:

Used first by US radio DJs when introducing old records. It isn't clear which DJ coined this, and no one lays especial claim to it. A strong contender has to be Jerry Blavat ('The Geator with the Heater'). Blavat's style was frantic and he was known for his impromptu 'stream of consciousness' verbal delivery. Here's an example from an article about him in 'The Progress', a Pennsylvania newspaper, from 1967:

Source: www.phrases.org

5/12/12

Idiom of the day! 'Needle in a haystack'

Meaning:

If trying to find something is like looking for a needle in a haystack, it means that it is very difficult, if not impossible to find among everything around it.















Source: www.usingenglish.com



3/12/12

Idiom of the day: to make a mountain out of a molehill

Meaning: If somebody makes a mountain out of a molehill, they exaggerate the importance or seriousness of a problem.


























Source: www.usingenglish.com
picture: www.lefthandtoons.com


26/11/12

More mouthy idioms...

To have your heart in your mouth
Meaning: To be really scared or anxious about something

To put your money where your mouth is
Meaning: To do something rather than just talk about it 

Butter wouldn't melt in his/her mouth
Meaning: When someone looks innocent (but probably isn’t!)


25/11/12

Phrase of the day: 'Big mouth'

Meaning: If you 'are a big mouth' or 'have a big mouth' it means you talk too much, especially about things which should be kept secret or avoided.


For example:

Fran's got such a big mouth. She's been telling everyone that I'm engaged. I wanted to tell them myself.

Oh no, me and my big mouth! I upset Alex when I mentioned his dead cat. 

Don't be such a big mouth. You should learn to keep other people's problems to yourself.

Don't confuse it with:

To bad-mouth. If you 'bad-mouth' someone it means you say negative things about them behind their back.

She's always bad-mouthing her friends. I really don't like it.


Source: www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish


15/11/12

Phrase of the day: 'Till the cows come home'

Meaning:

For a long but indefinite time.

Origin:

Cows are notoriously languid creatures and make their way home at their own unhurried pace. That's certainly the imagery behind 'till the cows come home' or 'until the cows come home', but the precise time and place of the coining of this colloquial phrase isn't known. It was certainly before 1829 though, and may well have been in Scotland. The phrase appeared in print in The Times in January that year, when the paper reported a suggestion of what the Duke of Wellington should do if he wanted to maintain a place as a minister in 
Peel's cabinet:

If the Duke will but do what he unquestionably can do, and propose a Catholic Bill with securities, he may be Minister, as they say in Scotland "until the cows come home."Groucho Marx was never one to pass up an opportunity for a play on words and this occurs in his dialogue of the 1933 film Duck Soup:

"I could dance with you till the cows come home. Better still, I'll dance with the cows and you come home."


Source: www.phrases.org.uk


14/11/12

Phrase of the day: Hoist with your own petard

Injured by the device that you intended to use to injure others.

The phrase 'hoist with one's own petar[d]' is often cited as 'hoist by one's own petar[d]'. The two forms mean the same, although the former is strictly a more accurate version of the original source. A petard is, or rather was, as they have long since fallen out of use, a small engine of war used to blow breaches in gates or walls. They were originally metallic and bell-shaped but later cubical wooden boxes. Whatever the shape, the significant feature was that they were full of gunpowder - basically what we would now call a bomb.




The device was used by the military forces of all the major European fighting nations by the 16th century. In French and English - petar or petard, and in Spanish and Italian - petardo.


Source: www.phrases.org.uk

1/11/12

Idiom of the day: to get the hump (British informal)

to get annoyed or upset with someone because you think they have done something bad to you Tony got the 
hump because he thought we hadn't invited him to the party. (British informal)

Source: www.idioms.freedictionary.com



30/10/12

Phrase of the day: Many a true word is spoken in jest


Meaning
A literal meaning; that the truth is often found in comic utterances.

Origin:
The first author to express this thought in English was probably Geoffrey Chaucer. He included it in The Cook's Tale, 1390:

But yet I pray thee be not wroth for game; [don't be angry with my jesting]
A man may say full sooth [the truth] in game and play.

Shakespeare later came closer to our contemporary version of the expression, in King Lear, 1605:

Jesters do oft prove prophets.


Source: www.phrases.org.uk


29/10/12

Idiom of the day: 'Like a chicken with its head cut off'



















Meaning:
In a frenzied manner

Origin:
Poultry may sometimes run around frenziedly for several minutes after decapitation.

The phrase was known in the USA by the late 19th century. It is recorded in print being used as a simile from the 1880s; for example, this piece about an escaped prisoner in The Atlanta Constitution, July 1882:

"Finding himself free from the heavy shackles, he bounced to his feet and commenced darting about like a chicken with its head cut off..."


Source: www.phrases.org.uk

25/10/12

Idiom of the Day - Cut to the chase:

















"Cut to the chase" is a saying that means to get to the point without wasting time.
The phrase originated from early silent films. It was a favorite of and thought to have been coined by Hal Roach Sr (January 14, 1892 – November 2, 1992). Films, particularly comedies, often climaxed in chase scenes to add to film time. Some inexperienced screenwriter or director, unsure how to get to the climax or the lack of script to meet time requirements, would just make an abrupt transition, known as a cut.[1]


24/10/12

Idiomatic language - do you know all of these expressions?






















Source:  @languagelab


22/10/12

Idiom of the day: Between a rock and a hard place!



















Meaning: In difficulty, faced with a choice between two unsatisfactory options.[1]

21/10/12

Idiom of the day: To be swamped











Meaning: to be overloaded (usually with work/things that need to be done)

Source: @languagelab


17/10/12 

Expressions with matter























Source: www.falibo.com

Idiom of the day: To find your feet

Meaning: If you're still finding your feet, you're still adjusting to a new place or a new situation.[1]

Examples:
It takes a while to find your feet when you start a new job, but you'll soon figure out who's who and what's what.
Gary's been studying here for three months and he still hasn't found his feet. Maybe he should try something else.

Source: www.englishclub.com 

1 comment:

  1. Short message service (SMS) or text messaging is the way of today. People compress their ideas into 160 characters or less to make the message fit in one page.grammatical errors

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